#Regram #RG @motherjonesmag: One of the nation’s largest school districts has adopted a novel new policy: Each student in the seventh through 12th grades will be permitted to skip school one day per school year to protest.⁠ Fairfax County in Northern Virginia, home to 188,000 students, will implement its new “civic engagement activities” policy next month. “I think we’re setting the stage for the rest of the nation with this,” Fairfax School Board member Ryan McElveen, who introduced the policy, told the Post. “It’s a dawning of a new day in student activism, and school systems everywhere are going to have to be responsive to it.”⁠ The policy is already facing backlash from conservatives who believe it is coddling liberal students, according to the @washingtonpost. When a school district in Maryland considered, but ultimately abandoned, a similar policy, conservatives across the country expressed criticism to its sponsor, arguing that kids should be in school rather than out protesting. But it’s hardly a liberal victory either; in a world where students have made some impact on issues like climate change and gun violence, one day of demonstrating per school year will hardly be enough to foment radical change.⁠ The power of student activism is growing, as showcased in the last two years by the students in Parkland, Florida, who survived a mass shooting in their school, and the youth climate movement worldwide. Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old climate activist-turned international celebrity, skipped school for weeks to urge action against climate change, and then helped establish a regular protest every Friday that spread among students throughout the world.⁠ The new policy may well encourage students who have never protested before to take a day off to march or sit-in. But as much as some parents and teachers may want to keep their kids in the classroom, the whole point of protesting is to be heard, and that may require breaking some rules.⁠ Click the link in @motherjonesmag bio to read more. (📸: @sam.vp/Mother Jones; Barbara Alper/Spencer Platt/Ronen Tivony/Erik McGregor/Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Getty)

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One of the nation’s largest school districts has adopted a novel new policy: …

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#Regram #RG @motherjonesmag: One of the nation’s largest school districts has adopted a novel new policy: Each student in the seventh through 12th grades will be permitted to skip school one day per school year to protest.⁠ Fairfax County in Northern Virginia, home to 188,000 students, will implement its new “civic engagement activities” policy next month. “I think we’re setting the stage for the rest of the nation with this,” Fairfax School Board member Ryan McElveen, who introduced the policy, told the Post. “It’s a dawning of a new day in student activism, and school systems everywhere are going to have to be responsive to it.”⁠ The policy is already facing backlash from conservatives who believe it is coddling liberal students, according to the @washingtonpost. When a school district in Maryland considered, but ultimately abandoned, a similar policy, conservatives across the country expressed criticism to its sponsor, arguing that kids should be in school rather than out protesting. But it’s hardly a liberal victory either; in a world where students have made some impact on issues like climate change and gun violence, one day of demonstrating per school year will hardly be enough to foment radical change.⁠ The power of student activism is growing, as showcased in the last two years by the students in Parkland, Florida, who survived a mass shooting in their school, and the youth climate movement worldwide. Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old climate activist-turned international celebrity, skipped school for weeks to urge action against climate change, and then helped establish a regular protest every Friday that spread among students throughout the world.⁠ The new policy may well encourage students who have never protested before to take a day off to march or sit-in. But as much as some parents and teachers may want to keep their kids in the classroom, the whole point of protesting is to be heard, and that may require breaking some rules.⁠ Click the link in @motherjonesmag bio to read more. (📸: @sam.vp/Mother Jones; Barbara Alper/Spencer Platt/Ronen Tivony/Erik McGregor/Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Getty)

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#Regram #RG @motherjonesmag: One of the nation’s largest school districts has adopted a novel new policy: Each student in the seventh through 12th grades will be permitted to skip school one day per school year to protest.⁠ Fairfax County in Northern Virginia, home to 188,000 students, will implement its new “civic engagement activities” policy next month. “I think we’re setting the stage for the rest of the nation with this,” Fairfax School Board member Ryan McElveen, who introduced the policy, told the Post. “It’s a dawning of a new day in student activism, and school systems everywhere are going to have to be responsive to it.”⁠ The policy is already facing backlash from conservatives who believe it is coddling liberal students, according to the @washingtonpost. When a school district in Maryland considered, but ultimately abandoned, a similar policy, conservatives across the country expressed criticism to its sponsor, arguing that kids should be in school rather than out protesting. But it’s hardly a liberal victory either; in a world where students have made some impact on issues like climate change and gun violence, one day of demonstrating per school year will hardly be enough to foment radical change.⁠ The power of student activism is growing, as showcased in the last two years by the students in Parkland, Florida, who survived a mass shooting in their school, and the youth climate movement worldwide. Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old climate activist-turned international celebrity, skipped school for weeks to urge action against climate change, and then helped establish a regular protest every Friday that spread among students throughout the world.⁠ The new policy may well encourage students who have never protested before to take a day off to march or sit-in. But as much as some parents and teachers may want to keep their kids in the classroom, the whole point of protesting is to be heard, and that may require breaking some rules.⁠ Click the link in @motherjonesmag bio to read more. (📸: @sam.vp/Mother Jones; Barbara Alper/Spencer Platt/Ronen Tivony/Erik McGregor/Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Getty)

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Leonardo DiCaprio

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2020-01-07 17:16:51

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Leonardo DiCaprio life

Leonardo Wilhelm DiCaprio (born November 11, 1974) is an American actor and film producer. DiCaprio began his career by appearing in television commercials in the late 1980s. He next had recurring roles in various television series, such as the soap opera Santa Barbara and the sitcom Growing Pains.

He debuted in his film career by starring as Josh in Critters 3 (1991). He starred in the film adaptation of the memoir This Boy's Life (1993), and received acclaim and his first Academy Award nomination for his supporting role in What's Eating Gilbert Grape (1993). He gained public recognition with leading roles in The Basketball Diaries (1995) and the romantic drama Romeo + Juliet (1996). He achieved international fame as a star in James Cameron's epic romance Titanic(1997), which became the highest-grossing film of all time to that point.